Bestione GJ112

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Product Vendor: swatchandbeyond.com

Product SKU: GJ112

1994 Vintage swatch watch Bestione GJ112 Designed by Gabriella Giandelli Diameter case 33 mm. Type strap 17mm Plastic Strap Water-resistant...

Product Details

1994 Vintage swatch watch Bestione GJ112

Designed by Gabriella Giandelli

Diameter case 33 mm.

Type strap 17mm Plastic Strap

Water-resistant 30 Meters / 100 Feet.

Brand new never worn, a new battery will be installed before shipping.

Plastic box and instructions are supplied.

About the artist

She was born in Milan, Italy in 1963, started doing comic strips in 1984 (published in Alter Alter journal, Frigidaire, Dolce Vita, Strapazin, Lecho des savanes, and Nova Express). She has worked as an illustrator of her own children's books, in the fashion industry, and created the Milo the Rabbit character for an animated TV series in Italy and France.

The story examines the lives of an apartment building through the eyes of an invisible white rabbit that reports back to his master, The Dark One, that lives in the basement, feeding off of the dreams of the tenants. Giandelli casts a wide array of characters, the most effective being the family of ghosts inhabiting their still-empty apartment (too happy in life were they to leave their now-haunted home) and an old woman who captures the interest of the Dark One as the only one with any vitality. "What a beautiful thing it is to die a little," says the beast in the basement, capturing Giandelli's theme of the vitality of life left behind by all but the old lady who, while seemingly on the verge of senility, is inducing hallucinations to an end that will be revealed in future episodes.

Giandelli covers every panel seemingly with pencil crayon, yet never looks busy (in fact, presenting even their living spaces as quite bare). The way she draws her eyes (especially on the mushrooms in issue one!) are very haunting, very penetrating; her characters' expressions illustrating their longing for a chance to start their lives over from scratch. She changes tones from a rusty red in issue one, to a grayish-green hue in issue two that I found more effective. Her scenery is as barren as the characters' lives, and I look forward to the next issue in hopes that Giandelli is celebrating the vitality of the old woman juxtaposed against the young that take their youth for granted. The fact that I only can muster empathy for the dead family, the old woman and the great scene of the two kids lying on the floor, playing out their fantasies of good over evil (a lesson their parents have clearly given up on) means Giandelli is straddling a fine line. Despair for despair's sake in comics is not a vision of life I care to promote, so here's hoping we just aren't drained of life along with her characters towards a nihilistic ending.

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